We are happy to announce the winners of 

The 2018 "F The Art World" International Art Competition 
The opening reception will take place in Chelsea, New York City on May 10th, 2018 at 6 pm

The show will be on display until May 17th, 2018

 

Location:

Unarthodox 
547 West 27th Street Suite 300
New York, NY 10001

 

All non-winning submissions will be displayed in a digital show during the opening ceremony on May 10th, 2018

 

 

Fine Art/Mixed Media

 

Council Chamber

47.24" x 70.87" 

AD-REFLEX, SOUTH AFRICA

The colla borative duo, AD-Reflex, was formed in 2015 and consists of contemporary South African artists Johan Conradie and KarlGustav Sevenster. The work of AD-Reflex is about duality and unexpected juxtapositions of beauty and decay. Their art resists and transcends perceptions of traditional boundaries on every level. Their work constantly morphs between abstraction and representation. In the more representational works by AD-Reflex the artists contemplate the allure and visual history of war and martyrdom, and reminds the viewer that perpetualviolence (the barbaric love and violence of power) has become a ‘natural state’ in the 21st century. Their central figures often show the scars of rituals and

faithful violence.

 

The more abstract works celebrate the mimetic qualities of 'paint' as a medium (both in its traditional form and through digital painting), together with processled

abstraction. Through the experimental nature of their processes and the use of the oil medium with various binding mediums, their work borders on the ‘alchemical’. In these works, mythological landscapes, drips and digital elements appear, then melt away in an endless mimicry, where no clear distinction can be drawn between the painterly and the digital.

 

About My Memory After 1990's of China

48" x 36"

BINGLIN LI, CHINA

Binglin Li is a Chinese contemporary artist with a variety of media interests.  "I am always aware of the restrictions imposed by the Chinese government. I was born in the 1990's. At that time, the Chinese government had a one-child family planning law, so I did not have siblings with my peers. We became the "lone generation." And I found that no one from this point of view to create works, so I tend to use this view to observe the world. And I do not want to attack these rules, because we can not change history, on the contrary, I want to record the changes that these historical events have occurred in our intellectual lifeI

Article I, Section 9, Clause 8

48" x 48"

ELLIS ANGEL, USA

Ellis Angel is an emerging activist artist. With a concentration in mixed media, more specifically paper weaving; Ellis seeks to reduce text and meanings to their basic parts in order to provide the viewer with a different reading of the theme. As with “Article I, Section 9, Clause 8,” Ellis provides a commentary or subtle protest through the subversive nature of destroying something of value.  Coupling this with the more female realm of weaving, but using paper rather than textiles, Ellis uses one of the oldest art forms to say something of current affairs.

 

“Article I, Section 9, Clause 8” refers to the emoluments clause of The Constitution. It reads: “No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince or foreign State.”

 

President Trump continues to profit from his holdings, and by implementing laws or holding events at his facilities as examples, creates a conflict of interest as our president. As a culture, we agree that both money and The Constitution hold value. This work is an act of resistance through the process of tearing up money and the constitution, reducing this little bit of personal wealth to nothing as civil disobedience. I’ve invested $100 dollars as a statement, but, as a nation, we stand to lose much more when we have someone in office that can make political decisions that allow him to profit personally. The office he holds asks that he serve the people, rather than himself. If you look closely, you’ll see Clause 8 circled in red.

Untitled

21" x 18"

MIWA NISHIMURA, JAPAN

"Everything is stacked up in layers that form our existence. We are all made up of these countless feelings. Each and every one. Both happiness and sadness never last forever. They push through time. The many squares imprint them in history, in life. Square have expressed every emotion to this point. Stacked beauty expresses our existence. Someday we certainly will die, but we surely existed. My work is a proof of our existence".

Day Sleeper

31.5"x 24"

Jungle

37"x 33.5"

SHAI YOSSEF, ISRAEL

 

Shai Yossef lives and works in Rosh HaAyin, Israel. Known for his varied oil paintings which are influenced mostly by social issues and the Bible.

 

"I believe we separate sometimes between what is real and what is imagined only for a basic need of definition, as an efficient life tool, although it is clear that only together, they form the Absolute. By using these two great powers, we create but at the time demolish. It will always be one of the most fragile relationships each of us has. Through art, I am searching a balance and inspiration within a mixture of past experiences, present times and future ambitions".

 

'Day Sleeper' was painted after a long period of almost three months since my last artworks in the end of summer 2016 because of some personal issues. Emotional baggage that had accumulated in my stomach exploded immediately on the canvas as soon as I got back to work in my studio. The name of the painting describes a kind of awakening dream - an expression of a state of surreal dysfunction.

 

The inspiration for painting "Jungle" was taken from the song by Grandmaster Flash -The Message. "It's like a jungle sometimes It makes me wonder how I keep from goin' under". The strong text and rare sound of this masterpiece from 1982 have had a deep impact on me.  Now I felt it's time to pull this figure out from this tough jungle called LIFE. To me, this figure represents courage and determination. The work on this painting was a very powerful experience. The roughness and the texture are very noticeable when you approach the

canvas.This gives the feeling of jungle thickness."

Digital Art

Murica

18" x 18" inches

 

LAURA CARL, USA

Laura Carl (1985, Kansas City, United States) creates digital artworks, drawings, and mixed media artworks. By using popular themes such as sexuality, politics, and religion, Carl touches various overlapping themes and strategies. Moments are depicted that only exist to punctuate the human drama in order to clarify our existence and to find poetic meaning in everyday life. Her works sometimes radiate a cold and latent violence. At times, disconcerting beauty emerges.  By emphasizing aesthetics, she makes work that generates diverse meanings. Associations and meanings collide. Space becomes time and language becomes an imageHer works demonstrate how life extends beyond its own subjective limits and often tells a story about the effects of patriarchal influence over the latter half of the twentieth century. It challenges the binaries we continually reconstruct between Self and Other, between our own ‘cannibal’ and ‘civilized’ selves.

Laura Carl currently lives and works in the Kansas City area. "Murica" represents robbing from the poor to feed the rich. Continuing to profit from the people without giving back.

Murica

95 cm x 85 cm

Sculpture

SHIRAN BAHRY, ISRAEL

Shiran Bahry works mainly with objects connected to aspects of my personal life and imposes a change on these objects. I am fascinated with their history and the fact that since they were discarded, they contain a memory or a message, that can shine through to touch something in the consciousness of the onlooker. I assign great weight to the state in which I find the object, and I respect its form. I am not interested in taking it apart, but rather in maximizing the beauty it already possesses.  Every object I find exists in a certain state and is made up of certain materials that dictate the way I will work with it. I add another dimension of interpretation and personal understanding when I find the right text for the object. Since the objects cannot speak for themselves, I bring forth their voice and I let them relate a message."

 

The object is a fencing mask made of a very dense metal mesh and fabric, whose function is to protect the face and neck area during battle. On the mask and between the mesh slots, I embroidered text from Henry van Dyke's poem "If All The Skies". The fusion of the song embroidered on the mask deals with balance and inner peace that is a result of opposites. We all wear masks and may feel it serves as a way to keep our inner balance. The question that arises is can one feel safe without them. The mask conceals the face and mouth of the fencer, and the text woven on the mask creates an identity, face, personality, and voice. At the same time, the sense of concealment and the border between the wearer and the rest of the world is strengthened. The text tries to express and "speak" what is happening inside, and the need to reveal, despite the imperfection.

Dueling/Dualing​

14" x 7.5" x 8.5"

Honorable Mention

Going Fishing

18" x 24" 

YERKEZHAN ABUOVA, USA

'I remember when we moved our furniture from my hometown in Kazakhstan to America. It looked completely out of place because our old furniture looked as if it was meant to hold my family, and the American furniture looked as if it was meant to hold someone else.

 

Feeling out of place caused me to understand the importance of my surroundings, which led me to create new stories and environments in seemingly ordinary places. My work explores the feeling of home and how people constantly move on to different places without remembering the past. Every place has its own history: the people who used to live there, the events that happened there, and what is left of it today. It is important to consider not only the events that people can see but also the invisible ones.

 

Some of my artworks are about places that have been left behind, while others are about creating new places. In both cases, I am interested in the stories that fill up the absences created by abandonment. In my work, I create homes for the memories of people who have departed and the objects they have left behind. Memories are temporary because when they are forgotten, they disappear, which is why some aspects of my artworks are transparent or hard to see.

 

I want to suggest what happens that people don’t know about, like when the refrigerator doors are closed and the ordinary aspects of our daily lives change completely memories."

 

"Going Fishing" drawing is about what would happen if everything in life was reversed. Here, the fish are fishing for people instead of people fishing for fish.

ALEJANDRO MACIAS, USA

 

Whether through personal experience, media or artistic exposure, the human form has directly informed my work. I gravitate towards figurative painting and drawing due to my struggle with identity, not just in terms of artistic approach, but what it means to be human and a first-generation Mexican American living in a contentious U.S / Mexico border.

 

My artistic endeavors gravitate and rise to reflect my inner struggle and the perilous dichotomy of my identity. I am interested in persona and the aesthetic design that correlates with those qualities. Color, line, and texture question and reinforce ethnic and cultural backgrounds, while also addressing social fears and trepidations.

Technique and artistic approach are typically divided and the division is a metaphor for my upbringing while living in a remote, and yet popularized, area in the United States. I often do not feel “Mexican” enough or “American” enough. I remain somewhere in-between. I seek to gain a better understanding of my ethnic background while framing and contextualizing the individual qualities of the people around me. The traditional artistic approach to painting and mark

making parallels Mexican values, tradition, and conservative upbringing, while the liberating mark making parallels diversity, change, and progressive thinking in twenty-first century America.

 

I love the Mexicans. No one is more Mexican than me.

36"x 36" 

All non-winning submissions will be displayed in a digital show during the opening ceremony on May 10th, 2018

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Copyright ©2018 F The Art World - International Art Competition  All Rights Reserved

 

 

 

Unarthodox


547 West 27th Street Suite 300
New York, NY 10001
646.964.4733  

info@unarthodox.com

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